5 types of personal logos to brand your design services

Ironically enough, one of the biggest challenges we face as designers is designing for ourselves. So when it comes to designing a personal logo, it’s no wonder that the task can feel like a huge undertaking. Regardless, it’s a project that really shouldn’t be ignored. Branding your design services will go a long way in acquiring the right clients, landing the kind of work you love, and creating a strong, memorable portfolio.

The good news is, there is no one right way to design your own logo. To help alleviate some of the anxiety around branding your design services, we’re shedding light on five different types of logos that work well for showing off your unique style and what you’re all about. Use these ideas as inspiration to represent yourself in your most authentic form!

Spell it out

Your personal logo doesn’t necessarily have to be a symbol. Using your written signature (or typed-out name) is both a personalized and timeless option to represent your brand. This type of logo works well for any kind of designer, but especially for type experts or lettering artists as it gives you an opportunity to let your skills shine.

Don’t be afraid to get creative with it — this is a chance to showcase your style and personality, so choose your typefaces thoughtfully!

  1. Identity Crisis
  2. Personal branding
  3. Rob Clarke – Horizontal Reversed

Row 1: Jonas Mosesson, Nick Schrader, Rob Clarke.


Mirror your style

Designers with a very distinct style should consider creating a logo that reflects their unique aesthetic. The designers below have done a great job at highlighting the kind of work they do through their personal logo design.

Graphic designer Benjamin Garner went with clean bold lines and a color palette often used in his work, while Lisa Quine leaned on her vintage, hand-drawn style to create her personal branding. Peter Voth designed a great logo for himself that features his intricate monoline skills.

Creating a custom logo that mirrors your style and uses design elements often seen in your work will go a long way in visually communicating your brand identity to clients.

  1. BGD Co.
  2. Peter Voth • Design & Illustration (2019)
  3. Personal Branding System

Row 1: Benjamin Garner, Peter Voth, Lisa Quine.


Illustrate yourself

Do you have some illustrating chops under your belt? If so, this is a great opportunity to show off your skills by illustrating your own custom avatar! If you are a designer who has a strong online presence, this works especially well because you can use the avatar seamlessly across all social media channels — they typically fit perfectly inside a small circle.

Get creative and play around with different versions or facial expressions like our very own Rogie below. Or, let your personality shine through like Lisa Engler who illustrated a mugshot of herself staying true to her witty and humorous vibe.

  1. Brand Refresh 2018 - Self Portrait
  2. Avatar Explorations
  3. Inmate No. 5318008

Row 1: Jake Bartlett, Rogie, Lisa Engler.


Go minimal

Your brand logo doesn’t have to be a crazy, intricate masterpiece. Many designers prefer going with a minimalistic approach like a monogram or a simple symbol. This works great for making a bold statement and you’ll avoid overshadowing any of the awesome work you want to highlight in your portfolio.

The best part is, minimal designs are usually timeless, so you won’t have to worry about updating your logo as you continue to develop your style. If you’re still figuring out your design style, this might be your best and safest bet for now.

  1. Personal Logo
  2. RP Logo
  3. Personal Brand

Row 1: Mark van Leeuwen, Ryan Putnam, Em .


Play on words

Now we know this won’t work for everyone, but hear us out. If you have a name (or business name) that you can visualize in a clever way, go for it! This is an excellent way to make you and your brand even more memorable. These examples of personal logos did just that, and it works.

Rose van der Ende went with an obvious play on words by designing a rose symbol to mimic her name, while Kyle Dingman took advantage of the “Ding” in his last name and designed a bell concept. Michael Penda went with a panda! Not a stretch in our opinion.

  1. Personal Branding
  2. Personal Brand
  3. Panda Knight

Row 1: Rose van der Ende, Kyle Dingman, Michael Penda.


Conclusion

We hope you found these logo ideas helpful! You might have noticed, all of these designs look completely different from one another, and that’s the beauty of it. At the end of the day, remember you have the final say in how you want to visually represent yourself. You call the shots, so take this opportunity to tell your story and communicate your services. Whether it be through typography in a wordmark, a simple symbol, or a unique logo that highlights your abilities, use your best judgment and choose a style that feels most authentic to you and your work.

Now get out there, and plaster your professional logo design on business cards, your website design, social channels, and of course Dribbble! We’d love to see what you come up with.

Find more Inspiration stories on our blog Courtside. Have a suggestion? Contact stories@dribbble.com.


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