Photography UX

Iphone5b-wood-recovered.psd___66.7___color_balance_1__layer_mask_16___

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10 Responses

  1. Rebecca Goldman Rebecca Goldman

    "Tap to capture. Hold to focus." Look at this.

    A new photography UX concept.

    What do you think? Criticism welcome.

    I'd like to create an immersive, incredibly easy photography UX -- an experience where I'm not distracted from taking the photo by having to find and tap the (relatively small) button in the tab bar.

    I added a soft gradient on the top and bottom to remove the sharpness of the black borders around the 4:3 image.

    UPDATE: Changed the copy and changed the red 'x' to a blue back arrow based on user testing. I also changed the shapes of the nav bar buttons to rectangles and kept the buttons that affect the camera (e.g. flash) as circles to provide a visual distinction. Finally, I removed the opaque rectangle from behind the coach mark, because I found that users thought they had to tap within that particular area on the screen in order to take a photo, and I want to make it clear that they can tap anywhere on the screen. Check it out!

    likes

    about 1 year ago

  2. Nuruzzaman Sheikh Nuruzzaman Sheikh

    Beautiful and simple works! love it :)

    likes

    about 1 year ago

  3. Michael Dolejš Michael Dolejš

    Great concept:)

    likes

    about 1 year ago

  4. Rebecca Goldman Rebecca Goldman

    likes

    about 1 year ago

  5. Raul Rincon Raul Rincon

    really nice concept.

    have you tried making those circles, rectangles? It seems to me that it would work better in relation to the big graphic in the center.

    Nonetheless, seems like a good idea that should be explored for future photo apps. Good work.

    likes

    about 1 year ago

  6. Rebecca Goldman Rebecca Goldman

    @Raul Rincon Thank you. :) I chose to make the buttons circular for a couple of reasons. First, this concept was initially part of an app in which the button style was based on circles, so it was a continuation of the design theme. Second, I want to make it visually clear that the notification in the center is not a button -- you can tap anywhere to take a photo, not just there. When I tried to make the notification circular or to reflect the rectangular shape in the buttons, the visual distinction between notification vs. button was unclear. I'll continue to refine this design, though, and I do appreciate your question! Thank you!

    about 1 year ago

  7. Sergey Valiukh Sergey Valiukh

    Cool!

    about 1 year ago

  8. Alice Lee Alice Lee

    I'd use it :)

    My only concern would be with the "hold to focus" concept. Sometimes tapping in the same general area multiple times helps clarify the desired depth of field for the phone camera if it gets it wrong initially, & tapping and then letting go is useful because it removes my finger from the area I'm trying to focus on (so I'm then able to see if the camera actually does indeed focus correctly, without my finger in the way). Thoughts?

    likes

    about 1 year ago

  9. Rebecca Goldman Rebecca Goldman

    @Alice Lee Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Alice. :)

    I envisioned two possible implementations for the "hold to focus" concept.

    The first is that you hold the screen to focus and then tap to take the photo once the camera has focused correctly. I think this would address your first concern.

    The second is where you tap and hold, and the camera takes a photo immediately after it focuses. What generates blurriness in my photos is having to tap twice: once to focus and another time to take the photo, thereby destabilizing the focused image. This implementation would solve that problem. Also, in experimenting with the camera, I've found I'm usually accurate with where I tap in order to focus on something, and the focus area is larger than my finger tip. So I can easily tell whether the phone is focused where I need it to be without removing my finger.

    With this approach, for those occasional times when the camera has mis-focused, I would have taken a blurry photo. I think it'd be worth building and seeing whether generating the wrong depth of field is an annoyingly common problem when implemented or whether we're generally more accurate than we think.

    What do you think?

    about 1 year ago

  10. Alice Lee Alice Lee

    Ah, I think that makes a lot of sense (particularly your first solution, which mainly solves what I was thinking of)! :)

    likes

    about 1 year ago

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