13 Responses

  1. Bart-Jan Verhoef Bart-Jan Verhoef

    There’s nothing like having our work reviewed by peers. As Mark Boulton stated earlier this year: “I feel crits are a place where you can fail without the fear of failure. A place where you can explain your work, debate outcomes, and move the work forward.”

    I believe dribbble can be, and in many cases is, a place of review and critique that helps our work move forward. I consider it the online equivalent of reviews we have with our colleagues at work. In that sense, the value and potential of dribbble, and services alike, is huge.

    As for me, the critiques I’ve gotten on dribbble have helped me improve my work tremendously and I am very thankful to dribbble and its community for that.

    That being said, I must say that I often wonder why we sometimes present our work in such ways that obscure the very work itself: the tilted photographs, heavy focus on surrounding browser chrome and Apple products and glow layers, and so on. Whatever the motivation behind presenting work in such a manner, the result is our work being less clear and visible, making it much harder, sometimes even impossible, for our peers to value and critique the work. Such a missed opportunity, if you ask me.

    As for myself, I want to share my work in such a way that allows you to see it and critique it, whether that sometimes is a full layout or just a detail of it. I will try to always tell a bit about what it is you are looking at, and what it is I’d like to know your opinion about.

    So I vow to share my work in progres as clear and unobscured as possible.

    I hope that if you share these views, you’ll rebound, repost, or share this however you see fit in order to help keep dribbble as amazing as it is and and help each other move our work forward and make great things.

    (As published on my blog)

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    over 1 year ago

  2. Visual Idiot Visual Idiot

    While I agree with everything you said there, I can't help but notice there's a typo on the word “progress” :(

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    over 1 year ago

  3. Bart-Jan Verhoef Bart-Jan Verhoef

    @Visual Idiot That's the spirit! thanks for the feedback, fixed it on my blog :)

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    over 1 year ago

  4. Kevin Hamil Kevin Hamil

    This is a great reminder. Thanks.

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    over 1 year ago

  5. Andrew Lucas Andrew Lucas

    *progress

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    over 1 year ago

  6. Joel Helin Joel Helin

    I think your message triumphs the spelling in this case. I wholeheartedly agree with what you're saying.

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    over 1 year ago

  7. Dan Beltechi Dan Beltechi

    Well said, @Bart-Jan. Re: "review and critique" — my bio says, "I'm learning. Don't pat me on the back. Tell me how I can do better."

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    over 1 year ago

  8. Senongo Senongo

    I really do agree. In trying to make this happen, it's important for me to try and explain clearly what my shot is, and ask for specific feedback or advice. The "what do you think?" method generally doesn't work in soliciting good feedback.

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    over 1 year ago

  9. Samuel Jesse Samuel Jesse

    Well said

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    over 1 year ago

  10. Falko Joseph Falko Joseph

    Amen to that.

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    over 1 year ago

  11. Łukasz Krysiewicz Łukasz Krysiewicz

    I agree, but am able to see the other side.

    Maybe not everyone treats dribbble same way we do? Maybe people want just show their work in the best (meaning fancy) way. Many people link to dribbble as their portfolio for example. Clients would often choose better looking (prettier for the eye, fancy) images.

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    over 1 year ago

  12. Łukasz Krysiewicz Łukasz Krysiewicz

    Also, not everyone want to buy PRO account, so they cannot upload bigger images, and it's often not easy to show something on 400x300 frame. You can show a button, but just a small part of webpage, which is pointless in the meaning of critic without seeing the rest.

    There is no 'right' or 'wrong' use of dribbble. Just use it the way you want.

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    over 1 year ago

  13. Bart-Jan Verhoef Bart-Jan Verhoef

    @Łukasz Krysiewicz I hear what you're saying and I understand that some see a different use for dribbble. Which is fine.

    Still though, I don't see why obscuring the work displayed would be a good idea; I'd personally prefer attracting clients who look beyond the glossy image of an iPhone, and look for actual value of an interface (within the context of the project and goals it was designed for) instead, for obvious reasons. In that sense, clients are just as much better served by unobscured work as we are when giving feedback to each other.

    I agree that there isn't a 'right' or 'wrong' way of using dribbble. I do think that sharing our ideas on how we can get the best out of dribbble and its community can help move it forward, just like crits can help our work move forward.

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    over 1 year ago

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