Finding Clients While Maintaining Professionalism

9 Responses

  1. Sean McCabe Sean McCabe

    How do you find clients? How do you get work? The common advice says to take what you can get, especially when you’re just starting out. You’ve got to pay bills, right? I talk about why this is the wrong mindset, and retort with a pointed approach to avoid setting yourself up for failure when looking for clients, and instead, how to focus on long term professional success.

    Listen now:
    seanwes podcast 024: Finding Clients While Maintaining Professionalism http://seanwes.com/podcast/024-finding-clients-while-maintaining-professionalism/

    likes

    6 months ago

  2. Mariusz Ciesla Mariusz Ciesla

    Awesome podcast, thanks!

    6 months ago

  3. Kishan Patel Kishan Patel

    Damn 'maintaining' looks so crisp. Any plans on making a font?

    6 months ago

  4. Sean McCabe Sean McCabe

    @Kishan Patel Working on a bunch of stuff currently, but I suspect in the next year or two, I will come back to type design again. =)

    6 months ago

  5. Chad Michael Chad Michael

    Very valuable podcast @Sean McCabe. Anyone who is deciding to go out on their own should be lucky to come across such strong advice.

    6 months ago

  6. Denis Korotkov Denis Korotkov

    Great podcast. But what to do if the work's cost is 5000$ but client can pay only 1000$. Do it for that price but provide greater value? Did I get it right?

    6 months ago

  7. Sean McCabe Sean McCabe

    @Denis Korotkov Thank you.

    To answer your question: no. If the work costs $5,000, the work costs $5,000. The only way to work with a budget of $1,000 is to remove $4,000 worth of features. You don't discount your rate. The only negotiation is in the amount of value you are providing.

    If a client cannot afford the quoted amount for the work, then it is up to you whether you would be willing to remove enough features from the proposed project to where the value delivered matches the available budget. Often removing the amount of features required to match a budget that is too low is not possible without compromising the effectiveness of the project. If this is the case, you should decline the project. To do otherwise is not only hurting yourself, but also the client, their project, and the industry as a whole.

    Focus on the value being provided. This is what your pricing should account for. If the client is receiving relatively adequate value in return compared to the investment that is required, then it should be a very simple business choice. Otherwise, if they don't have the budget, they are not ready to hire a professional. Again, don't discount your rate.

    I strongly recommend giving episode 008 a listen: Unlocking the Power of Value-Based Pricing.

    likes

    6 months ago

  8. Sean McCabe Sean McCabe

    @Denis Korotkov Just one last followup note: On the topic of providing greater value, you were partially correct. Always provide greater value than mere direct correlation to what you’re being paid. With that said, you would not discount your rate, but in the case of the example you provided, you would do a job for $5,000 and provide, say, $7,500 worth of value. This is how you enable yourself to grow. You then have a paid job where you created a theoretical $7,500 worth of value at which level you can use as a base price for your next client project.

    likes

    6 months ago

  9. Denis Korotkov Denis Korotkov

    @Sean McCabe thanks a lot for your help!

    6 months ago

keyboard shortcuts: previous shot next shot L or F like