Victory

26 Responses (page 1 of 2)

  1. Joachim Vu Joachim Vu

    A piece of flourished script lettering. Don't be shy and hit 2x !

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    6 months ago

  2. Mark Jooste Mark Jooste

    Swashtastic!

    6 months ago

  3. Anna Frederick Anna Frederick

    what a beaut!!!

    6 months ago

  4. Joseph Alessio Joseph Alessio

    Ah this is lovely! I might trim down the weight of the 'V' downstroke, as it's the thickest stroke in the composition and sticks out somewhat. I love the treatment of the 'r', and you swashes are always so nicely balanced!

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    6 months ago

  5. Joachim Vu Joachim Vu

    @Mark Jooste @Anna Frederick Thanks :)
    @Joseph Alessio the overweighted V was originally a feature as the upstroke was also heavier on the top curve so the whole letter could stand out. It didn't work quite well so I thinned down the upstroke and now the downstroke may indeed look a bit too heavy. And thanks for the compliment on the swashes, creating flourishing patterns really is an exciting thing, plus it teaches a lot about balancing shapes and curves.

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    6 months ago

  6. Matt Potter Matt Potter

    Absolutely beautiful. That cursive lowercase "r" is sick.

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    6 months ago

  7. Matt Vergotis Matt Vergotis

    mmm, so delicately silky smooth. Love it. I also thought the same as @Joseph Alessio regarding the thickness of the V.

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    6 months ago

  8. RaitG RaitG

    just love this letters
    The capital V for me looks not so clear (the right swash, connected to body stem so large, remains me the Y)
    http://monosnap.com/image/SSgq9yAEwajZtjxuC2QoOVBHv

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    6 months ago

  9. Florin Capota Florin Capota

    great great curves! RaitG has a pretty valid point i think since an Y could also be spotted, it's not very strong but maybe still something to consider :)

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    6 months ago

  10. Martin Roberts Martin Roberts

    Beautiful.

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    6 months ago

  11. Joachim Vu Joachim Vu

    @RaitG @Florin Capota Yes I've noticed that V/Y thing, and playing with the weights a bit should make things clearer. But this is lettering not type, so in that particular context I think the word recognition is still okay ! (and this would be an awful Y)

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    6 months ago

  12. Florin Capota Florin Capota

    haha, you're right, not the best lookin Y ;) some weight balance will surely solve this

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    6 months ago

  13. Jillian Adel Jillian Adel

    All that talk of swashes got you excited... This gets me excited...

    6 months ago

  14. Joachim Vu Joachim Vu

    @Jillian Adel how not to get excited when there are swashes involved, right?

    6 months ago

  15. Joseph Alessio Joseph Alessio

    @Joachim Definitely; I have a lot of work to do on my swash-making abilities! ;-)

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    6 months ago

  16. Jillian Adel Jillian Adel

    @Joachim Vu obviously. lookout for a party of swashes popping up from my practice very soon. also, what type of a script is this considered? spencerian?

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    6 months ago

  17. Joachim Vu Joachim Vu

    @Jillian Adel It's more inspired by the engraved interpretations of Roundhand from late 17th century (which are not dependent of any ductus, see how shades aren't necessarily placed on downstrokes).
    Spencerian has some easily recognizable features: the lowercase letters aren't all shaded and the capitals have a different construction and a characteristic placement of the shade at the very bottom of the downstroke. This said, the flourished script lettering style from the 70's is also called Spencerian, although it doesn't share much with the written form...

    6 months ago

  18. Jillian Adel Jillian Adel

    @Joachim Vu oh weird. yeah for all of my practice, i've not sat down and copied script alphabets literally before which is where my sudden interest is coming from but i've been aiming to focus on copperplate first off. spencerian is next up, so i'm interested to see the 70s version you're talking about.

    6 months ago

  19. Joachim Vu Joachim Vu

    @Jillian Adel You're probably already familiar with it, it's the script style made famous by DiSpigna, Carnase etc.
    Have fun learning copperplate, it's a great script and really helpful for a better understanding of letter construction when drawing lettering based on pointed pen.
    Go check iampeth.com for the 19th century US styles (engrosser's script and spencerian), and I always recommend The Universal Penman for one of the best example of late 17th-18th century english Roundhand styles.

    6 months ago

  20. Jillian Adel Jillian Adel

    @Joachim Vu I will check out all of those things. I'm pretty ashamed I've been in the lettering game for roughly 4 years now (probably only 2 where I had any idea what I was doing) and am only now cracking down on technicalities. But also, have you seen this? http://www.iampeth.com/books.php

    6 months ago

  21. Giuseppe Salerno Giuseppe Salerno

    respect!

    6 months ago

  22. Joachim Vu Joachim Vu

    @Giuseppe Salerno thanks Giuseppe!

    @Jillian Adel yes, I mostly look at the vintage books on the iampeth site. The instructional videos are a nice introduction to making letters in the copperplate style but the book section is full of gems and there's much to learn from it!

    6 months ago

  23. Joachim Vu Joachim Vu

    @Jillian Adel btw, with lettering, I face some situations where I'm pretty sure I have no clue what I'm doing on a very regular basis. I find this exciting as it means I will soon learn something new!

    6 months ago

  24. Jillian Adel Jillian Adel

    @Joachim Vu ha, don't we all feel that way sometimes. keeps you on your toes. the books are great for specimens, but also great reads too http://tha-playground.tumblr.com/post/65907440013/writing-is-not-a-special-gift

    6 months ago

  25. Joachim Vu Joachim Vu

    @Jillian Adel I'm a bit late, but yes, great advice! Practice without study (or vice versa) can't give the best results. Those “Practice makes perfect” pieces miss the point! Copying a feature isn't that hard (easy with a pencil, requires a bit of practice in calligraphy) but understanding how it works is the tough part.

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    5 months ago

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