AIGA Pittsburgh | The Machinery [GIF]

The-machinery

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19 Responses

  1. Ryan Hamrick Ryan Hamrick

    The Pittsburgh AIGA asked me to design something to use for its letterpress workshop at Sapling Press as part of its Typography Month.

    Actually jumped straight from semi-rough sketch to vector and somehow got the variable width tool to cooperate again.

    Large full mockup attached!

    likes

    7 months ago

  2. Ryan Hamrick Ryan Hamrick

    Thanks also to @Jay Fanelli for his feedback on the bottom type.

    likes

    7 months ago

  3. Arno Kathollnig Arno Kathollnig

    ... stunningly beautiful!!! +++

    7 months ago

  4. Vincent Tantardini Vincent Tantardini

    Gorgeous @Ryan. Wonderful work on curves.

    7 months ago

  5. Bob Ewing Bob Ewing

    This is truly fantastic Ryan! You ability to achieve balance with lettering is aw-inspiring!

    likes

    7 months ago

  6. Jessie Wyatt Jessie Wyatt

    This is gorgeously done!

    7 months ago

  7. Simon Frouws Design Simon Frouws Design

    Very inspiring this, and will be for the workshop too.

    likes

    7 months ago

  8. Sydney Jean Sydney Jean

    beautiful

    7 months ago

  9. kirk visola kirk visola

    Man, I wish I had half your talent. lol. This is sick man. Good stuff.

    likes

    7 months ago

  10. Jacqui Oakley Jacqui Oakley

    Lovely

    7 months ago

  11. Kyle Letendre Kyle Letendre

    This is just insane. Congrats!

    7 months ago

  12. Chris Rushing Chris Rushing

    Gorgeous dude.

    7 months ago

  13. Jesus™ Jesus™

    *Jaw on the floor*

    7 months ago

  14. Florin Capota Florin Capota

    amazing lookin Ryan!

    7 months ago

  15. Ryan Hamrick Ryan Hamrick

    likes

    7 months ago

  16. I mentioned yesterday that this piece was somehow done with the variable width tool in Illustrator again. Here's a peek at how that happened and a look at how powerful it can be to get your bezier handles parallel.

    With a script like this at least, all the handles, with the exception of end points (and the occasional supporting points in the middle of a "S" curve like the swash on the 'l' in 'always', for example), should really be either parallel to each other, or occasionally perpendicular.

    Of course there are sporadic exceptions to this, as there are with any rule—but not many.

    There's a bigger shot attached for a closer look.

    7 months ago

  17. Michael Spitz Michael Spitz

    Awesome piece Ryan.

    7 months ago

  18. Kossyo Kokalanov Kossyo Kokalanov

    WOOOOW!

    7 months ago

  19. Paul Dunbar Paul Dunbar

    This is the shizzzznit, well done.

    7 months ago

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