Selling a Soggy Sandwich

18 Responses

  1. Justin Mezzell Justin Mezzell

    I wrote about putting out work that's functionally useless but aesthetically pleasing.

    And sandwiches.

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    8 months ago

  2. Xalion Xalion

    I find your writing more interesting.

    8 months ago

  3. Luke Ritchie Luke Ritchie

    There see to be a lot of sandwiches like that around these days

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    8 months ago

  4. Zack Davenport Zack Davenport

    Couldn't have said it better myself.

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    8 months ago

  5. Mark Conlan Mark Conlan

    Brilliant.love it

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    8 months ago

  6. Axel Herrmann Axel Herrmann

    You nailed it @Justin - I tweeted about this issue this morning and it feels like a lot of the fancy but not user friendly desing works on dribbble get pushed by waving the fanboy flag, but only a few designers/viewers question these works (and here comes the big "WHY?") - the user in the end will surely do.

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    8 months ago

  7. Zack Davenport Zack Davenport

    @Axel Herrmann yeah, I'm pretty sure users don't care how many likes your design got on Dribbble if they can't even figure out the UX.

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    8 months ago

  8. JP Brown JP Brown

    Really enjoy reading your thoughts, thanks for posting these

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    8 months ago

  9. kellianderson kellianderson

    Love the divot-ed, soggy sandwich!

    It is difficult to know exactly what type of work prompted your blog post/critique…(if I knew, I *might* agree with you—I fear that this is probably a phenomenon outside of my awareness.) However, I-for-one really ENJOY seeing the oddball experiments, the long-shots, the "could-this-work?"'s and thinking about the alternate possibilities. Design's "tent" is as big as the human experience itself—there is never a single "correct way", there are so many legit paths leading to a problem's resolutions (bending it towards functionality or towards aesthetics or towards one kind of ideology or another.)

    If everyone is super-conservative about what they choose to share and —perhaps even more problematic—willing to define places like dribbble narrowly as a platforms for self-promotion— we are not expanding the possibilities for each other's work, supporting each other's skills/visual-literacy, we are not pushing design forward. We're just rewarding conservatism over conviction.

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    8 months ago

  10. Rino Wenger Rino Wenger

    Well it's quite ironic that you actually turned that soggy sandwich into a work of art just by illustrating it like this. But I totally agree with the point you're making.

    8 months ago

  11. Isaac Grant Isaac Grant

    Agreed!!! Someone please make a website solely dedicated to smart design solutions.

    8 months ago

  12. Justin Mezzell Justin Mezzell

    Thanks, everyone!

    8 months ago

  13. Justin Mezzell Justin Mezzell

    @kellianderson
    Totally resonate with what you're saying. I had a hard time trying to piece together the article as it was, indeed, crafted around a specific example. While I felt this would be a lot more effective in the argument, I wasn't comfortable singling out any person or work. More importantly, I don't know the intention of the user or their story enough to be able to cast a judgement on their work. So I resolved to run the risk of making sound it sound blanketed and prescriptive. Totally not the intention.

    The piece was more about putting the same amount of work we're putting into the design into the experience (which is equally a part of design). Figuring out what looks "cool" isn't easy and I don't mean to downplay the work that goes into that. I'm more interested in encouraging that same amount of energy being used into asking about actual use case scenarios.

    Part of this post was prompted by my own experience in agency work, where the UX team is separate from the UI team. I'm bummed by the misconception that design doesn't involve building functional experiences.

    I'm certainly no one to tell anyone else what Dribbble should be used for. Experiments in work and challenging the norm in interaction are the kinds of things we should feel safe doing in a community of people. It's a resource not many fields afford for their laborers. That's not to say that we shouldn't put out work that is just trying something outrageous. I'm sure that plenty of great experiences have been built around preposterous offerings. Maybe these designs prompt conversations that can lead to a unique and fulfilling experience.

    Just wanted to encourage us, as the design team, to not let the "UX" team be the creative directors over the experience. I'd like to think we're more than just the last line of defense in aesthetics.

    Also, thanks so much for the critical thoughts. I'm super grateful to banter about these thoughts and wrestle with my own intentions which always deserve reflection on intention and motivation.

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    8 months ago

  14. kellianderson kellianderson

    @Justin Mezzell Ah, yes… that makes sense… and I sympathize with the difficultly in illustrating your specific point when the ideal example can't be revealed.

    [[OK- I have to be extremely lame now and turn off the internet in the name of deadlines.]] Thanks for discussing these topics… I suspect that discussion is the very antidote to the design-thinking-insularity and I appreciate it.

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    8 months ago

  15. Justin Mezzell Justin Mezzell

    @kellianderson Thanks for taking the time to chat. Much appreciated! Let's do it again real soon.

    8 months ago

  16. Jake Fleming Jake Fleming

    Agree with some of what your saying in the blog post especially about how important ux is, but dribbble is about what you're working on, not what you're done with.

    8 months ago

  17. Justin Mezzell Justin Mezzell

    @Jake Fleming
    While I fully understand where you're coming from, Dribbble is what the community has made of it. Users decide its purpose for themselves. If you use Dribbble as a source for what you're working on, that is perfectly acceptable. The paradigm shift in Dribbble's tag from "What are you working on" from "Show & Tell for Designers" would suggest that its use is open for interpretation, as is this post.

    Thanks for the feedback :)

    8 months ago

  18. Lee Waters Lee Waters

    Great read.

    8 months ago

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